Kongo Zen - The Lost Buddhism of Tenjiku

25 October 2014
Comments: 3
25 October 2014, Comments: 3

Buddhism was originally created in Tenjiku, and gradually spread to China.  Over the passage of time, superstition and rituals became more important than the true meaning of the doctrine and people were more interested in quoting the actual words Buddha had spoken than in understanding the meaning behind these words.

The purpose of Daruma’s coming from the west

(i.e. Tenjiku-India)

 

Buddhism in China at the time of Daruma’s coming was all prayer and theory. People believed that if they lived a devout life, prayed regularly, and built temples or made offerings to the Gods, they could be assured of a place in heaven.  This applied not only to themselves but to members of their family too.  As a result of this belief, only the rich and powerful could go to heaven because only the rich people could afford to build temples and hold elaborate ceremonies.

This was the opposite of Buddha’s teachings, and as Daruma was trying to teach true Buddhism, he was not well received in China.  He was a threat to the rich and powerful.  Therefore, he sought refuge in Suzan until his death.

Buddhism was originally created in Tenjiku, and gradually spread to China.  Over the passage of time, superstition and rituals became more important than the true meaning of the doctrine and people were more interested in quoting the actual words Buddha had spoken than in understanding the meaning behind these words.

Kongo Zen: Tenjiku nara no Kaku

 

Kongo Zen is not a teaching that stresses the reading of the sutras or the worship of ancestral tablets.  Nor is it thought that the ancestors and oneself can be saved and sent to a paradise by the preaching of sermons.  Also, faith healing, the giving of alms to the poor, endless visits to the temples for worship and the reliance on others for one’s own salvation is not a part of Kongo Zen.

swastika kempo small

The word “Zen” comes from the early Indian word “Dhyana” which is one of the six virtues of a Bodhisattva.  There are four Dhyana and they represent the four stages of meditation leading to an awakening of knowledge (Japanese: Satori).  The four stages of Zen are:

  1. Pranayama – control of life-force (Ki energy)
  2. Pratyahara – withdrawal of life-force from the sensory organs
  3. Dharana – focussing the life-force and attention on the inner light
  4. Dhyana – absorbed in the grace of light

‘Tenjiku nara no kaku’ means ‘the spiritual-martial art of heaven’.  The Chinese referred to Ancient India as ‘heaven’.

 

 

3 responses on “Kongo Zen – The Lost Buddhism of Tenjiku

  1. C.V.RAMAKRISHNAN says:

    We are all Blessed be born in Heaven (INDIA) and to Know Tenjiku nara no Kaku” Thank you Sensei to bring it back to India for all of us to benefit

  2. Thank you ever so for you article.Thanks Again. Fantastic.

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